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Create If Writing - Authentic Platform Building for Writers & Bloggers

Create If Writing is a weekly podcast for writers and bloggers dealing with authentic platform growth. Kirsten Oliphant interviews experts to find out how they are building email lists, connecting through Twitter, and using Facebook groups. These practical episodes are balanced out with inspirational interviews from successful writers and bloggers who have made it big and want to share the struggles, the creative process, and tips for reaching your goals whether you are an author publishing books or creating an online presence through blogging.
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Now displaying: Category: podcasting
Sep 16, 2015

I love a good story. And I love a good SCARY story. You don't have to be a scary story fan yourself to enjoy this episode where I interview Aaron Mahnke from Lore Podcast. (But you DEFINITELY want to be a scary story fan if you listen to Lore.) Aaron is a writer of scary stories himself. (Find his books HERE.) I love the story of how he came to create Lore. You can read it in his words on his blog, but the short of it is that he had been trying to created a freebie for his email list. In his words:

I believe people innately hunger for story. We enjoy a well-told, well-written tale. It allows us to escape for a moment and live in someone else’s world, a world where problems have solutions (most of the time) and  things make sense (again, mostly). Story is in our DNA and it’s our legacy. 

So much YES. A giant thanks to Marianne Tolosa from The Lipstick Campaign for recommending this podcast to me! Find Aaron on Twitter (as Lore and as himself Aaron), Instagram, the Lore Podcast website, or his author page. Buy his books HERE or subscribe to Lore HERE. 

My Favorite Quote: 
"Sometimes folklore is paint on top of a just a messy human situation and we tell it through the lens of a fairy tale or scary story because humans really can't be the monsters."
Big Ideas

Aaron has been doing the self-publishing routes and Lore came out of Aaron creating a freebie for his email list.
His journey in starting Lore, like so many stories I've heard, was sort of a happy accident, or an organic creation that sprung out of something his other work.
Each podcast episode takes about 30 hours to create, start to finish.
Reading out loud reveals how some words sound next to other words. <- This is great for editing the written word, not just spoken words! 
Aaron uses Evernote to save ideas, links, and photographs as he researches and prepares topics.
The podcast has helped him to find the time to write because it has allowed him to be freed up from his other design work.
To get his most recent novel finished, he committed to writing 2000 words a day and then wrote those words. Every. Day.
Aaron is a plotter, not a pantser. Plotters tend to more comprehensively outline and plan things out while pantsers traditionally write by the seat of their pants. (Let me know in the comments which YOU are!)
Lore was NOT started as a way to market books, though it's a very natural connection that makes sense. I think the difference is in the quality of Lore.
In terms of podcast ads, he keeps to sponsors that make sense also with the podcast itself and with the audience. He also puts them at the end to be less obtrusive to the content itself.

Want to Start a Podcast?
We talked about starting podcasts and the technical bits to that. If you are thinking about starting a podcast, I'll be having a series here very soon, but here are some other links! (And I would HIGHLY recommend paying someone to edit. I've used Christopher Wright and he was affordable, fast, and did  a GREAT job. It's worth the money. Trust me.)

We talked about the different kinds of production and planning for podcasts. Aaron writes out a script and then reads it in a way that is very natural and not forced. For my interviews (and in the intros and outtros) I tend to write a few outline-y notes and then go off-the-cuff so it sounds more natural.

Pat Flynn's Free Podcast Course
John Lee Dumas' Free Podcast Course
Aaron Mahnke on How to Get Your Podcast into the Top 20
How to Start a Podcast in Two Weeks
So You Want to Start a Podcast?

Relevant Links

Home Work - Aaron Mahnke's other podcast about working from home
The Wake - graphic novel that's inspiring Aaron this week
What I Want to Know from YOU
Do you listen to Lore & love scary stories like I do? (We can still be friends if you don't.)

Aug 7, 2015

Two and a half days. Twenty-five pages of notes. More knowledge than I can possibly share here. The Podcast Movement conference was honestly the best conference I have ever been to. Not simply because of the attention to detail and how smoothly everything went, but because of the incredible sessions and the connections with other podcasters and speakers. I can say now that Aisha Tyler, who is laugh-out-loud funny, also possesses the ability to make me cry.

Why so incredible? Podcasting is not new and yet it still has an aura of freshness. A palpable sense of excitement buzzed through the Omni in Fort Worth. Coming straight from a blogging conference, the difference in atmosphere was staggering. Everyone I talked to had an excitement about their podcast, whether they are on their 50th episodes or just gearing up to launch.

I met Taylor Bradford from Pink Heels Pink Truck and the Boss Girl Creative podcast. She and I had been friends online but never actually me, so it was great to have another person I could hang around with and share notes and observations.
Best Sessions
Practical Application: Meron Bareket led a session on sound that totally gave me the tools I needed to up my game. I've got an editor for some of my interview episodes, but the difference in this week and the weeks before is stunning. Plus? His post-production method took ten minutes.

Inspiration: I feel like this was a ten-way tie. Hearing Sarah Koenig from Serial was incredible. It was like EXPERIENCING an episode of Serial. I got to meet John Lee Dumas before his keynote and was so impressed with how kind and generous and real he was. I'm a huge fan of Pat Flynn, so getting to hear him talk (and beat box) put a giant smile on my face. He had some really neat stories (that I mention in this episode) and shared his vulnerabilities and fears with us.

 

What impressed me most about the speakers across the board was how incredibly willing they were to connect. They took time to talk to EVERYONE. They did not put on airs. Katie Kimitsos, who led a session on community, talked with me and Taylor at the end of the conference about some of the things she is working on and her goals.

I really loved getting to meet Cliff Ravenscraft, aka The Podcast Answerman. He had a meet up I attended before things officially started and I got to actually talk in person about my podcast. When I had a few questions after the conference, he dived into the comment thread to answer. THAT is the kind of connection I felt as a theme of the conference and was very much what Cliff talked about in his session. He had so many great things to say, many of which impacted this episode.

Can I tell you about this episode? It's a little weird. 

There's no music, first of all. Just me. While I LOVE the music that my friend Josh of Unbroken Light put together for me when I called in a favor when I started the podcast, I want to shift a few things and I think shifting the music is a must. When listening to a session on email newsletters, Maritza Parra challenged us to think about niche and to be even MORE niche than we already are. What could be more niche than a podcast for writers and creatives dealing with the passion and practice behind making good art?

PLENTY.

The more I thought about it, the more I saw this podcast as a place for the worn out. The burned out. The tapped out. The down and out. I feel like this podcast provides inspiration and tools for writers and other creatives who find themselves in that boat. The vision isn't wholly different than the one I came in with, but it is more specific and I think better helps me think about my goals.

Which brings me to my biggest two goals after Podcast Movement: 

1. Sound. (Thanks, Meron!!!)

2. Connection.

I want to connect better with my guests. To have amazing interviews, not just GOOD interviews.

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